Two words: Bill Cunningham

I was hooked. HOOKED, I tell you.

{via google}

Bill Cunningham New York is the name.

Setting. Friday night after coming home from a rainbow sprinkled coffee ice cream @ SF creamery.

After watching an episode of my guilty pleasure, I went on Netflix to find something more to munch on. I debated between The Unusuals, a crime drama tv show starring JEREMY RENNER! (j’adore), and The Unusual Suspects (no relations to The Unusuals.)

But I chose Bill Cunningham New York instead and in the end. It was Top Rated in the New Arrivals section. And I trust Top Rated flicks on Netflix.

So I started watching it with the intention of skimming through it, looking for bits and pieces that seemed worthwhile, and giving up on it entirely if it didn’t serve me any good.

But to my unexpectations, I kept on watching, not moving the cursor to different scenes or skipping a single second, but waiting for the next part to unfold, and the next part, and the next, and then ended up watching the entire documentary. It was like consuming a whole bowl of cereal: milk, soggy crumbs, and all. (And I’m not the type who eats/drinks all the cereal milk.) (And yes, I am aware that “unexpectations” is not a real word. The red squiggly line underneath “unexpectations” tells me that very well. But I like to use fake words :-) )

I was even struggling to keep watching because I was so tired. But I had to. keep. going.

I was hooked.

{via wiki}

Bill Cunningham lives and works in New York. He’s an 80-something year old photographer of fashion with an interesting philosophy on clothes and photographing them. He works for The New York Times‘ style section and takes pictures of fashion on the street and sorts them into categories and publishes a collage of a distinct style in each issue. One week it’s on denim dresses, the next on shirts with raybans screenprinted on them, and the week after that on crazy heels. This film documents his past and present and tries to get in on his personal.

The man looks so unfashionable and so ordinary and so old that no one (except those who know and respect him) would suspect him to be “the most important person in the world” (according to one staff on Fashion Week in Paris) (that was a pretty funny part in the film. *spoiler* Bill C goes to Paris for Fashion Week, and he’s trying to get into a runway show. None of the youngster staff members recognize him and shrugs off the old man. Then an older staff member comes at them like they’ve committed heresy, and hastily sets things right by telling them that, “This is the most important person in the world!” and carefully escorts Bill C inside in one swift motion as to avoid expensive china dropping on the floor and shattering. Funniest thing ever.)

I fancy him for doing what he does at his remarkably old age and his unique mode of lifestyle and his quirks and his film camera and the way he rides his shabby bike so deftly (even though he looks so frail.) Above all: it shows what he does and why he does it.

The film might seem very shallow and materialistic since it’s mainly about fashion and trends, but I liked the documentary because of its documentary aspect. It follows and documents a person that I found to be fairly likable and incredibly interesting.

And before I even knew it, the documentary was over! I simply dread documentaries that go over an hour (e.g. Never Say Never) but this one was done so well.  *Applause

So now it’s 3:28am, and I’m writing about it cause I just couldn’t believed that I was so hooked. And I’m really tired also but I thought I’d write things down before I sleep and wake up the next morning having forgotten everything. Come to think of it, I should’ve wrote about Bon Iver and how AMAZING it was. Hopefully the Bon Iver fever doesn’t wear off too quickly.

{via SFweekly}

While on the topic of tv and media and whatnot:

Another guilt p: Team COCO.

http://teamcoco.com/video/conan-busts-employees

I watched this clip like ten times already.

“Uh. There was a time when I wasn’t on the list. And I’m glad I’m on the list now.”

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2 responses to “Two words: Bill Cunningham

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